All posts by scuba-shack-radio

Scuba Shack Radio #19 – 11-17-19



In this episode we discuss our time at DEMA, clothing made from recycled plastic, and another installment of Your Next Dive – Little Cayman.

Our three days at DEMA was packed. We had a chance to meet with all of our partners, look at new products, research various travel options, talk with organizations involved in ocean health and sustainability and meet some interesting people in the dive community. We talked to Autumn Blum –  founder of Stream2Sea, Bob Denton – the inventor of Sink the Stink, Cathryn Castle Garcia – executive editor of Dive Training Magazine, and Stuart Cove. We also had a nice chat with Zale Parry of Sea Hunt fame.

Clothing made from recycled plastic sounds like a great idea. On one hand it is taking plastic out of the ocean but at the same time may be putting it back in a different way. Turns out that synthetic fibers shed when being washed and produce microfibers that can’t be filtered out in our treatment plants. There are two different types of fabrics that are being made that if washed properly will result in positive outcomes. The two fibers are Repreve and Econyl. Some options to reduce microfibers include hand washing, using Cora balls, Guppyfriend washing bags, or a Lint LUV-R washing machine filter.

If you’ve never been to Little Cayman – get there. If you’ve been there before I am pretty sure you’ll want to get back there soon. The Little Cayman Beach Resort is a top-notch resort with great rooms, a fantastic all-inclusive dining facility and large pool and bar area. You can also relax in a beach-side hammock. The onsite dive operation – Reef Divers run 4 – 46 foot Newton dive boats that accommodate up to 20 divers. They are truly valet diving that get you to Bloody Bay Wall quickly. The diving on Bloody Bay Wall is some of the best I’ve encountered.


Scuba Shack Radio #18 – 11-3-19



In this episode we discuss the Halcyon Traveler BC, the Keeling Curve, and some more of our diving history with the salvage of the submarine S-51 in 1925/26.

The Halcyon Traveler BC is a great light weight BC with the control and stability of the backplate and wing configuration. The Traveler BC is a 30 pound lift capacity wing and weighs in at just about 7 pounds – half the weight of the Infinity BC with a stainless steel backplate and tank adapter. The nylon backplate has four weight pouches that can hold up to 12 pounds total. You can also add the Halcyon active control ballast pockets on the waist band or the trim tab pockets on the tank bands. The Halcyon Traveler BC is fantastic for dive travel to warm water destinations.

The Keeling Curve is a graph of the accumulated CO2 in our atmosphere from 1958 to the present. It is named for the scientist Charles David Keeling. It has been described as one of the most important works of the 20th century. It shows the rise from 315 parts per million (PPM) in 1958 to 406 PPM in 2018. This dramatic increase is alarming. The Keeling Curve also shows the seasonal variation of CO2. Until the mid 20th century scientist thought the ocean would easily absorb the excess CO2. Now we know that isn’t happening.

The book “On the Bottom” by Commander Edward Ellsberg is the story of the salvage of the submarine S-51 that sank after colliding with a steamer in 1925. The book tells an incredible story of our diving history. Working at a depth of 132 feet, the divers needed to secure the submarine inside and outside and then rig it for lifting. The salvage operation required a great deal of innovation and ingenuity along with unbelievable courage.


Scuba Shack Radio #17 – 10-19-19



In this episode we discuss Project Aware and the PADI Specialty, Marine Protected Areas, and another installment of Sea Hunt – It’s Still Alive

It is called Project Aware because it started in 1989 as a project with PADI to support ocean conservation. AWARE stands for Aquatic World Awareness, Responsibility and Education. Project Aware focused on 10 ways that divers can protect the underwater environment. These 10 ways have evolved into the 10 tips for divers to protect the ocean planet. In 1992 it officially became a separate entity called the Project Aware Foundation. Listen for more information on Project Aware and the PADI specialty or go to https://www.projectaware.org/

Marine Protected Areas are any area of the marine environment that has been reserved by federal, state, territorial, tribal or local laws or regulations to provide lasting protection for part or all of the natural and cultural resources therein. MPA came into being with Presidential executive order 13158 signed by President Clinton on May 26, 2000. MPA are managed by the Commerce Department under the direction of NOAA. The executive order supports another law called the National Marine Sanctuary Act first passed in 1972. You can read more about marine protected areas on the NOAA site at https://marineprotectedareas.noaa.gov/

A diver find a sunken Japanese submarine with a lethal nerve gas agent seeping out. That is what season 2 episode 15 of Sea Hunt is all about. “Nerve Gas” premiered on April 12, 1959. Mike and his dive buddy Stan – an LAPD police officer who is a judo expert are dispatched to help a diver who started freaking out after finding a submarine. While trying to revive the diver (Leonard Nimoy), Mike also becomes effected. Turns out the problem is nerve gas leaking from a sunken Japanese submarine. Mike and Stan have to seal up the leaking submarine – but not without problems. Listen to hear more about all the action in “Nerve Gas”


Episode 16 – 10-6-19



In this episode we discuss DEMA, the latest IPCC Climate Change report, and introduce a new segment called Your Next Dive – first up Maui

DEMA is the Dive Equipment and Marketing Association with the mission of bringing business together to grow the diving industry. DEMA has more than 1400 member businesses. They have a number of strategic goals and objectives along with tactical goals. You can read more about DEMA at their website https://www.dema.org. One of their tactical goals is to put on an annual trade show. That is the DEMA Show and brings together over 9000 buyers, vendors and dive professionals with a focus on education, products, services and networking. DEMA Show has been ongoing since 1997.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published their latest Summary for Policy Makers on September 25, 2019 titled “The Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate”. The report was created by 65+ drafting and contributing authors from around the globe. The ocean and cryosphere comprise over 80% of the world. The findings are dramatic. You can download a copy of the report from the IPCC website. https://www.ipcc.ch

Your Next Dive takes you to Maui. If you are going to Maui and staying on West Maui our pick for dive operators is Lahanai divers. They run two 42 foot Newton dive boats that are comfortable, roomy and ride nice. You can dive multiple islands with Lahaina divers – Lanai, Molokini, Molokai, and Maui. In the winter (February timeframe) water temperatures are between 75 and 77 degrees F. Dive sites on Lanai include First and Second Cathedral, Mempachi Cave, Sargent Major, and Monolith. Molokini includes inside the crater as well as the backwall. You can also dive the wreck of the Carthaginian or Mala Wharf.


Episode 15 – 9-22-19



In this episode we discuss the value of a log book, the Sea Turtle Conservancy, and motion sickness

I consider your log book as a very important piece of your dive gear. Unfortunately, the dive log is often neglected by divers. It is your dive diary. If you keep your dive log up-to-date you will be able to look back and relive those dives. You will know how the dive went, what you wore on the dive, the conditions and so much more. Be a conscientious diver and maintain your dive log. Listen to a couple of my dives from my dive log.

Sea turtles have been under threat for a very long time. The Sea Turtle Conservancy https://conserveturtles.org has been working to protect sea turtles since 1959. Originally the Sea Turtle Conservancy started as the Brotherhood of the Green Turtle in response to the book The Windward Road by Dr. Archie Carr. One of the threats currently faced by all sea turtles is artificial lighting. Listen for more information on how the Sea Turtle Conservancy is helping to address this problem.

For some divers boat diving is a challenge. It is a challenge because of motion sickness. We just don’t know why some people are prone to seasickness while other aren’t. There are several articles on the DAN website that discuss possible causes, medications and other remedies. A lot of great diving is done from dive boats. Hopefully if you suffer from motion sickness you will be able to find the best remedy for you. 

https://www.diversalertnetwork.org/medical/articles/Motion_Sickness

https://www.diversalertnetwork.org/medical/articles/Motion_Sickness_Updated_2003

https://www.diversalertnetwork.org/medical/articles/Transderm_Scop_The_Patch

 

 


Scuba Shack Radio #14 – 9-8-19



In this episode we discuss scuba tank visual inspections, age and diving, Sea Hunt – the other pilot episode

We learn early on in our training that there are two different types of inspections for scuba tanks – hydrostatic (every 5 years) and the annual visual inspection. Only the hydrostatic test is mandated in the US by the US DOT. The visual inspection is a scuba industry standard. It all came about in the 1970s in response to a study conducted by the University of Rhode Island on behalf of the National Underwater Accident Data Center titled Investigation of scuba cylinder corrosion – phase 1. The findings were powerful enough for our industry to self-regulate on this critical safety inspection.

As we grow older, we are not able to do some of the same physical things that we did in our youth. Diving should not be one of those things. There is a chapter in The Complete Diver by Dr. Alex Brylske that discusses age and diving. There is some great info in this chapter along with the reference to a study published in 2003 that shows that age does not dramatically impact diving as long as we stay physically fit.

Mark of the Octopus was actually the first episode of Sea Hunt that was ever produced. It was a pilot episode used to try and sell the show to networks or syndicators. We are introduced again to Mike Nelson fresh out of the Navy, his boat, and the gadgets like an underwater TV camera. Mike is working again for Marine Land of the Pacific at the start of the show. When two divers go missing he is hired by a mining company to find them. One of the divers turns up dead with octopus like marks on his leg but Mike is skeptical and turns out he is right. Underwater fights, spear guns, regulator hose cuts, feeding eels, capturing porpoise, trying to catch a manta ray make this a must see episode.


Scuba Shack Radio #13 – 9/1/19



In this episode we discuss Nitrox, whales and ocean noise, and where did the term SCUBA come from (you might be surprised)

Enriched Air Nitrox is one of PADI’s most popular classes. Why – longer no decompression limits, especially on repetitive dives. With a combination of electronic learning, classroom lecture, use of the dive computer and practical application, you are ready to manage the risks associated with Nitrox, mainly oxygen toxicity and have more fun. Nitrox is an essential class for all scuba divers.

The ocean is a noisy place and getting louder all the time. Whether it is from shipping, seismic testing or sonar, the noise is doing great harm to the ocean inhabitants, especially whales and dolphins. You can check out a couple of web sites – https://us.whales.org or http://wildwhales.org. The film titled – Sonic Sea is a powerful documentary on this serious threat. You can order it on Vimeo.

Where did the term SCUBA come from? It wasn’t Jacque Cousteau. It was coined in a paper written by Dr. Christian J Lambertsen and Walter A Hahn in 1952. The report is titled “On Using Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus”. It was written for the National Academy of Sciences National Resource Council as Publication 274. Dr Lambertsen was also the inventor of the Lambertsen Amphibious Respiratory Unit (LARU) – a very early rebreather.


Scuba Shack Radio #12 – 8-18-19



In this episode we talk about the Surface Marker Buoy, hyperbaric chambers and “The Terrible Hours”

Several years ago PADI introduced deploying a surface marker buoy as a key skill into their Open Water certification. A very important safety feature that every diver should understand and be able to execute in the real world. Sometimes you will need to deploy the SMB when on a drift dive or if you aren’t in the vicinity of the boat when you surface, you will want the boat to see you and come and pick you up. Always carry a SMB when diving in the ocean.

Sometimes divers experience decompression sickness where nitrogen comes out of our tissue too quickly. The hyperbaric chamber or recompression chamber is used to treat this problem by recreating the environment of the dive at depth and slowly bringing the diver up at a controlled rate. Treatment can last several hours to multiple days. You should always know the location of the closest hyperbaric chamber to where you are diving and don’t forget to purchase your dive accident insurance.

https://www.sportdiver.com/how-does-hyperbaric-chamber-work

The Terrible Hours is a book written by Peter Mass about the rescue and salvage of the USS Squalus, a submarine that sank off the coast of New Hampshire in 1939. The submarine was in about 240 feet of water and the rescue of 33 men from the vessel under the direction of then LCDR Charles “Suede” Mumson who was the pioneer of submarine escape and rescue. It is an incredible read and will definitely keep you riveted.


Scuba Shack Radio #11 – 8-4-19



In this episode we discuss function checking your dive equipment, seafood waste and the first episode of Sea Hunt.

Too often we read about diving incidents that could have been avoided had the diver completed a simple pre-dive function check. It is simple, easy and takes very little time to do. Once everything is assembled, simply turn on your gas, check both regulators (primary and alternate second stage) by breathing both, then power inflate the BCD to ensure it properly inflates and that the over pressurization valve releases. Finally, deflate the BCD. With your function check complete to can now have the peace of mind that your life support gear is working properly.

There is an article in Hakai Magazine by Sasha Chapman titled “Wasted” and it discusses the issue of seafood waste. The article points out that 27 % of fish caught is wasted. This waste happens along every link from harvesting, processing, manufacturing, distribution, retailing and consumers. Sasha discusses the varying causes and points out that it is cheaper to discard than re-purpose.

The first episode of Sea Hunt aired on January 4, 1958. It was titled Sixty Feet Below. There were 39 shows in season 1 and it ran through October 4, 1958. This episode introduces us to Mike Nelson an ex-Navy frogman working at Marine Land of the Pacific. The show is about a downed Navy experimental jet that has a pilot trapped inside. Mike’s job is to mark the jet and rescue the pilot. With time running out on the pilot’s air supply, Mike saves the day.


Scuba Shack Radio #10 – 7-21-19



In this episode we discuss boat bags, IUNC Red List,, and the movie that inspired Sea Hunt –  Underwater Warriors

Once you get to your dive destination and are ready to go to the dive boat you will want a boat bag to get all of your gear to and from the boat. Two options are the Akona Delux Mesh Duffel and the Akona Delux Mesh Backpack. Both bags are durable, pack nicely for your trip, and make hauling your gear to the boat practical.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUNC) Red List of threatened species is now over 100,000 species. Sadly, no species improved their status during the recent reporting period. Many turtles and sharks are on the endangered list. For more information, use the links below.

https://oceanconservancy.org/blog/2019/07/18/record-high-number-species-threat-extinction/

https://www.iucnredlist.org/

Underwater Warriors is the movie that inspired Sea Hunt. The movie was released in 1958 and was produced by Ivan Tors. It is based on the book by CDR Frances Fane – a pioneer with the Navy’s Underwater Demolition Team. The movie traces the evolution of the UDT from swimmer, to rebreather diver, to open circuit aqualung diving. The movie stars Dan Daily and Ross Martin. Zale Parry of Sea Hunt fame is also featured.